You're Shopping At
You're Shopping at:

Pride Stories: Patrick Landrum

a crowd of people holding a rainbow flag

Ethos – Philadelphia Patient Care Associate Patrick Landrum (he/him) knew who he is with certainty from a very early age.

“I never really remember being told what being LGBTQ+ was, but all I knew is that I knew I was gay since I was 5 years old,” Landrum, now 35, said. 

While the facts about his identity have always been clear to Landrum, he said that his coming out experience at age 16 was not an easy or particularly pleasant one.

“I was not ready to be out, and I didn’t know how to deal with it properly,” Landrum said. 

Landrum shared that he began consuming cannabis shortly after coming out, sharing cannabis with a close camaraderie of supportive friends who consumed regularly.

“I still talk to many of those friends today, and I’ve converted most of them to patients,” said Landrum. “My personality flourished when I found my people… Everyone accepted Patrick was just that – Patrick.”

Unlike many of his friends, however, Landrum knew that his cannabis consumption was not “just for fun.” It was a way to feel better while facing those struggles.

“I realized early on that I was self-medicating – I wasn’t just getting ‘high’ like my friends were,” Landrum said. “I simply felt normal and like I fit in when I consumed cannabis, like I felt comfortable. It was also very different from drinking, which I never liked because I don’t like the feeling of losing who you are. With cannabis, you can be who you are.”

The loving embrace of friends and the cannabis community helped Landrum “make it through” that rough time, he shared.

“It doesn’t matter who you are – everyone who consumes and medicates is very open minded and very accepting, and I haven’t found too many people who aren’t,” Landrum said. “People simply feel more loved when they are allowed to be who they are, whether they’re bi, trans, queer, or just want to dress up in drag.”

Landrum said that he knows he’s far from alone when it comes to cannabis and mental health. The science is on his side: Cannabis can help manage anxiety and bouts of post-traumatic stress that can be triggered by stressful or negative experiences.

“In the queer community, I think that your dark thoughts can take hold sometimes,” Landrum said. “Cannabis can be a helpful way to cope with those feelings.”

Landrum said that is especially important for those in the LGBTQ+ community with intersecting identities that can further alienate some from their family and neighbors.

“It’s not just being gay – there can be race and other identities alongside that which create more anxiety, pressure, and post-traumatic stress from bad experiences,” Landrum said. “I think that’s so crucial for studies and community research going forward to consider and include those circumstances.”

Landrum also hopes that medical cannabis can make inroads to help those with opiate use disorder. He lost a close family member to a heroin overdose in 2019, further reinforcing to him how cannabis can be a safer alternative to those struggling with their mental health.

“The opioid epidemic is as big as the AIDS epidemic was, and touches way more communities,” Landrum said. “I feel strongly that medical cannabis can be a replacement for opiates, and help people not feel hopeless.”

Landrum channels that desire to help into his role as a caregiver. He is a registered caregiver for his best friend, who manages a rare condition that qualifies for medical cannabis in Pennsylvania, and for a close relative, a patient who does not have a driver’s license and therefore cannot easily get to the dispensary.

“I was a caregiver before I entered the cannabis industry, so I’ve seen a lot of change, both as someone who works for a dispensary and someone who is part of the program,” Landrum said. “Being a caregiver has given me a great opportunity to see the program grow.”

Ultimately, Landrum said the community surrounding cannabis is accepting, open-minded, and welcoming – the perfect mix for promoting healing and shaping a supportive community.

“If I could give any advice to anyone, it would be to be more curious and less judgmental of others,” Landrum said. “Everyone has their baggage, and most of us could use a pat on the back and a little understanding.”

Read more Pride Stories here

 

Finding Confidence Through Cannabis

Ethos – Philadelphia Patient Care Associate Patrick Landrum (he/him) knew who he is with certainty from a very early age.

“I never really remember being told what being LGBTQ+ was, but all I knew is that I knew I was gay since I was 5 years old,” Landrum, now 35, said. 

While the facts about his identity have always been clear to Landrum, he said that his coming out experience at age 16 was not an easy or particularly pleasant one.

“I was not ready to be out, and I didn’t know how to deal with it properly,” Landrum said. 

Landrum shared that he began consuming cannabis shortly after coming out, sharing cannabis with a close camaraderie of supportive friends who consumed regularly.

“I still talk to many of those friends today, and I’ve converted most of them to patients,” said Landrum. “My personality flourished when I found my people… Everyone accepted Patrick was just that – Patrick.”

Unlike many of his friends, however, Landrum knew that his cannabis consumption was not “just for fun.” It was a way to feel better while facing those struggles.

“I realized early on that I was self-medicating – I wasn’t just getting ‘high’ like my friends were,” Landrum said. “I simply felt normal and like I fit in when I consumed cannabis, like I felt comfortable. It was also very different from drinking, which I never liked because I don’t like the feeling of losing who you are. With cannabis, you can be who you are.”

The loving embrace of friends and the cannabis community helped Landrum “make it through” that rough time, he shared.

“It doesn’t matter who you are – everyone who consumes and medicates is very open minded and very accepting, and I haven’t found too many people who aren’t,” Landrum said. “People simply feel more loved when they are allowed to be who they are, whether they’re bi, trans, queer, or just want to dress up in drag.”

Landrum said that he knows he’s far from alone when it comes to cannabis and mental health. The science is on his side: Cannabis can help manage anxiety and bouts of post-traumatic stress that can be triggered by stressful or negative experiences.

“In the queer community, I think that your dark thoughts can take hold sometimes,” Landrum said. “Cannabis can be a helpful way to cope with those feelings.”

Landrum said that is especially important for those in the LGBTQ+ community with intersecting identities that can further alienate some from their family and neighbors.

“It’s not just being gay – there can be race and other identities alongside that which create more anxiety, pressure, and post-traumatic stress from bad experiences,” Landrum said. “I think that’s so crucial for studies and community research going forward to consider and include those circumstances.”

Landrum also hopes that medical cannabis can make inroads to help those with opiate use disorder. He lost a close family member to a heroin overdose in 2019, further reinforcing to him how cannabis can be a safer alternative to those struggling with their mental health.

“The opioid epidemic is as big as the AIDS epidemic was, and touches way more communities,” Landrum said. “I feel strongly that medical cannabis can be a replacement for opiates, and help people not feel hopeless.”

Landrum channels that desire to help into his role as a caregiver. He is a registered caregiver for his best friend, who manages a rare condition that qualifies for medical cannabis in Pennsylvania, and for a close relative, a patient who does not have a driver’s license and therefore cannot easily get to the dispensary.

“I was a caregiver before I entered the cannabis industry, so I’ve seen a lot of change, both as someone who works for a dispensary and someone who is part of the program,” Landrum said. “Being a caregiver has given me a great opportunity to see the program grow.”

Ultimately, Landrum said the community surrounding cannabis is accepting, open-minded, and welcoming – the perfect mix for promoting healing and shaping a supportive community.

“If I could give any advice to anyone, it would be to be more curious and less judgmental of others,” Landrum said. “Everyone has their baggage, and most of us could use a pat on the back and a little understanding.”

Read more Pride Stories here

 

Finding Confidence Through Cannabis

Ethos – Philadelphia Patient Care Associate Patrick Landrum (he/him) knew who he is with certainty from a very early age.

“I never really remember being told what being LGBTQ+ was, but all I knew is that I knew I was gay since I was 5 years old,” Landrum, now 35, said. 

While the facts about his identity have always been clear to Landrum, he said that his coming out experience at age 16 was not an easy or particularly pleasant one.

“I was not ready to be out, and I didn’t know how to deal with it properly,” Landrum said. 

Landrum shared that he began consuming cannabis shortly after coming out, sharing cannabis with a close camaraderie of supportive friends who consumed regularly.

“I still talk to many of those friends today, and I’ve converted most of them to patients,” said Landrum. “My personality flourished when I found my people… Everyone accepted Patrick was just that – Patrick.”

Unlike many of his friends, however, Landrum knew that his cannabis consumption was not “just for fun.” It was a way to feel better while facing those struggles.

“I realized early on that I was self-medicating – I wasn’t just getting ‘high’ like my friends were,” Landrum said. “I simply felt normal and like I fit in when I consumed cannabis, like I felt comfortable. It was also very different from drinking, which I never liked because I don’t like the feeling of losing who you are. With cannabis, you can be who you are.”

The loving embrace of friends and the cannabis community helped Landrum “make it through” that rough time, he shared.

“It doesn’t matter who you are – everyone who consumes and medicates is very open minded and very accepting, and I haven’t found too many people who aren’t,” Landrum said. “People simply feel more loved when they are allowed to be who they are, whether they’re bi, trans, queer, or just want to dress up in drag.”

Landrum said that he knows he’s far from alone when it comes to cannabis and mental health. The science is on his side: Cannabis can help manage anxiety and bouts of post-traumatic stress that can be triggered by stressful or negative experiences.

“In the queer community, I think that your dark thoughts can take hold sometimes,” Landrum said. “Cannabis can be a helpful way to cope with those feelings.”

Landrum said that is especially important for those in the LGBTQ+ community with intersecting identities that can further alienate some from their family and neighbors.

“It’s not just being gay – there can be race and other identities alongside that which create more anxiety, pressure, and post-traumatic stress from bad experiences,” Landrum said. “I think that’s so crucial for studies and community research going forward to consider and include those circumstances.”

Landrum also hopes that medical cannabis can make inroads to help those with opiate use disorder. He lost a close family member to a heroin overdose in 2019, further reinforcing to him how cannabis can be a safer alternative to those struggling with their mental health.

“The opioid epidemic is as big as the AIDS epidemic was, and touches way more communities,” Landrum said. “I feel strongly that medical cannabis can be a replacement for opiates, and help people not feel hopeless.”

Landrum channels that desire to help into his role as a caregiver. He is a registered caregiver for his best friend, who manages a rare condition that qualifies for medical cannabis in Pennsylvania, and for a close relative, a patient who does not have a driver’s license and therefore cannot easily get to the dispensary.

“I was a caregiver before I entered the cannabis industry, so I’ve seen a lot of change, both as someone who works for a dispensary and someone who is part of the program,” Landrum said. “Being a caregiver has given me a great opportunity to see the program grow.”

Ultimately, Landrum said the community surrounding cannabis is accepting, open-minded, and welcoming – the perfect mix for promoting healing and shaping a supportive community.

“If I could give any advice to anyone, it would be to be more curious and less judgmental of others,” Landrum said. “Everyone has their baggage, and most of us could use a pat on the back and a little understanding.”

Read more Pride Stories here

 

Choose Your Location

Come Back Again

You must be over 21 years of age to view this website.

Find Your Products

Are you over 21 years of age?

Shopping Cart